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Icy roads

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Thu, 03/07/2014 - 9:02am

Take great care out there over the next few days folks. Snow on the tops, rain yesterday and frost overnight can mean Black Ice - especially on bridges and shaded areas of road. You cant see it and it can be lethal. Keep your speed down and Ride carefully.

BMHS and CBTA in June 2014

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Mon, 30/06/2014 - 8:56am

Congratulations to Chris, Liam, Denise, Matthew and Jonathan who all achieved their Basic Handling Skills certificates in June

and also to James and Joshua who passed their CBTA 6R assessment to get their restricted motorcycle licence. Well done everyone - it was great to meet you all and a pleasure to work with you.

Congratulations

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Sun, 08/06/2014 - 9:27am

Well done to Charlotte, Graham, Jesse, Nicholas, Katie, Tu and Brendon who did our Basic Motorcycle Handling Skills course and achieved their Certificates in April, and also to Carl, Johnathan, Richard, Ian, Hemi and Margaret who did the same during May. Hope by now you've all been to the AA with your certificates, sat the theory test and got your Learner Motorbike Licence. Thank you for choosing us, it was great to meet you all. Look forward to having you back to do the CBTA in the near future!

Johns Safe Riding Tips; Winter Riding - Warm hands, warm heart

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Mon, 26/05/2014 - 5:48pm

94; Cold can bring on fatigue quickly, fatigue will affect your riding performance. Wear suitable warm clothing and good, well maintained riding gear.

97; On longer rides, take a spare pair of gloves so if one pair gets wet you have a dry pair to change into. Wet gloves are cold gloves.

98; Heated handle bar grips are a great option for winter riding

101; If you don't have heated grips & your hands are getting cold, you start losing the feeling in them, stop and warm them up. Hand dryers at petrol station toilets are a good way to warm hands and you can dry or warm your gloves on your bikes' engine casings.

Johns Safe Riding Tips; Winter Riding - Warm hands, warm heart

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Mon, 26/05/2014 - 5:48pm

94; Cold can bring on fatigue quickly, fatigue will affect your riding performance. Wear suitable warm clothing and good, well maintained riding gear.

97; On longer rides, take a spare pair of gloves so if one pair gets wet you have a dry pair to change into. Wet gloves are cold gloves.

98; Heated handle bar grips are a great option for winter riding

101; If you don't have heated grips & your hands are getting cold, you start losing the feeling in them, stop and warm them up. Hand dryers at petrol station toilets are a good way to warm hands and you can dry or warm your gloves on your bikes' engine casings.

Johns Safe Riding tips; Winter Riding

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Sun, 25/05/2014 - 5:34pm

87; When riding in winter be careful on shaded parts of the road. It may still be damp and can be slippery or even still frosty/icy all day (even on a clear sunny day)

88; Try to avoid riding in EXTREME icy or snowy conditions

93; Watch for 'Black Ice' on shaded roads & bridges, especially through cuttings, on corners & bridges. Hitting Black Ice is extremely dangerous on a motorcycle, you have zero traction and there is almost nothing you can do to control the bike.Go slow, bike upright and in a straight line, keep off the brakes,use the gears instead. Keep all actions gentle and smooth. Sometimes riding in the gravel on the side of the road may help give you some traction.

Johns Safe Riding tips; Winter Riding

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Sat, 24/05/2014 - 8:55am

89; In winter riding conditions,ride at a safe speed, allow longer braking distances & make smooth, gentle steering and braking maneuvers so that you don't unsettle your bike

90; Ride in a higher gear

91; Stay on main roads with more traffic - they are more likely to be clearer of snow and ice

92; Ride in vehicle wheel tracks to avoid ice grit, especially when cornering.

Johns Safe Riding tips; Winter Riding

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Thu, 22/05/2014 - 4:21pm

102; For Winter riding, always be sure there is plenty of tread on your tyres. 1.5mm is the legal minimum, - this is usually not enough for safe riding in winter conditions.

Brass Monkey Rally x2

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Thu, 22/05/2014 - 8:35am

Preparations for the Monkey continue...anticipation increasing... Tyre tread depth is good - no need for new tyres before the off. Oil changed last night. Tyre pressures will be checked on the day of leaving. One heated handle bar grip needs attention - loose wire? After the weekend, check the tent, warm riding gear, helmet, visor etc.

Johns Safe Riding tips; Winter Riding

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Wed, 21/05/2014 - 6:18pm

100. When riding in cold conditions, your tyres don't heat up the same as on warmer days, so you may have less tyre grip on the road. Take greater care when accelerating and keep your speed a tad slower than you normally would - especially when cornering and braking.

 

Johns Safe Riding Tips - Sun Strike

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Tue, 20/05/2014 - 2:38pm

105. In autumn and winter time, sun strike (caused by the low angle of the sun) for motorbike riders is a very real danger – you are literally ‘blinded by the light’.  Keep your speed down when coming over the brow of a hill or rounding corners that might face into the sun.
106. Be aware that sun strike also affects other drivers on the road. A driver coming towards you who is affected by sun strike,  simply will not see you or your motorbike and perhaps not even the road markings –lower your speed,  ride defensively and give them plenty of room.

Winter Riding x2

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Mon, 19/05/2014 - 5:05pm

In frosty winter conditions, many bridges are likely to have invisible black ice on them.Keep your speed down, keep your bike in a straight line and exercise caution.

Winter riding

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Mon, 19/05/2014 - 2:48pm

Keep your helmet visor scrupulously clean when riding in the low winter sun.  Carry cleaning product (we use Pledge furniture polish) and soft cloth with you on every ride and remember; don't use tissues or other paper products to wipe your visor - these are made from wood and will eventually cause fine scratches - causing another hazard to hamper your riding safety.(which you don't need!)

CBTA

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Mon, 19/05/2014 - 2:40pm

Thumbs up for Josh who blitzed the CBA 6F on Saturday. Josh had done the training a couple of weeks ago and then practiced hard to get everything right for the assessment. Well done Josh!

Brass Monkey Rally

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Mon, 19/05/2014 - 9:50am

Brass Monkey Rally is looming (Queens Birthday weekend) and the annual anticipation is building around here! This is one weekend John NEVER misses - the holy grail of m/cycle rallies! If you're heading down to Oturehura for the Monkey, keep and eye out for John on his old blue beemer and wave out - he loves to catch up with old and new mates. 

Jacob passed his CBA 6R! Well done - pleasure working with you to achieve this, looking forward to your CBTA 6F!!

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Sat, 03/05/2014 - 6:30pm

CBTA

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Thu, 27/03/2014 - 9:16am

CONGRATULATIONS to John Mullins who is one of the first (if not THE first) riders in New Zealand to pass his CBTA 6F assessment on 20 March 2014 - and he did it with us at Marlborough Motorcycle Riding School. Well done John!

John's Safe Riding Tips

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Thu, 28/11/2013 - 7:32am

John's Safe Riding Tips - Helmets

#1; Always wear a helmet that fits you properly. Not too loose, not too tight. You shouldn't be able to move your head independently inside your helmet.

#2; NEVER buy a second hand helmet (you don't know how much it's been knocked around) Buy a new helmet the meets safety standards in New Zealand and replace it every year or two.

#3; Wearing a white or brightly coloured helmet increases your chances of being seen by other road users.

#4; Keep your helmet clean and in good condition. Don't drop it on hard surfaces, remember - it protects your head.

#5; Keep your helmet visor clean and free of scratches. I carry 'Pledge' furniture polish for cleaning my visor every time I ride.

#6; Use a soft cloth for cleaning helmet visors. NEVER use tissues, napkins or other paper products - they're generally made from wood and will eventually cause fine scratches which can obscure your view.

#7; At night and in low sunlight, a scratched visor causes reflective glare making it difficult to see hazards, road conditions and other traffic clearly.

 

Australian Motorcycle Museum

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Sun, 10/11/2013 - 8:46am

On a recent visit to Brisbane, Jane & I visited the Australian Motorcycle Museum just outside Ipswich. The museum houses a fascinating collection of over 200 motorcycles - all sorts of makes & models, some really old, some not so old, some quirky inventions and home built bikes. All were in perfect condition.

In one area, in  pride of place on a stand sitting above the rest was an original 1969 Honda 750cc in immaculate condition- same colour and very similar to the model that I used to own! It was brilliant.

This place is well worth a visit if you're heading across the ditch to Brizzy.

New Tyres fitted for the summer?

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Wed, 23/10/2013 - 9:41am

New Tyres; - we all need them at some stage and there’s always that anticipation for a ride  when you’ve  just had new tyres fitted to your bike.

Recently a friend told me of an experience he had in just that situation.                 Bike registered for the summer, new tyres fitted and he headed out for  his first ride of the season. The ride was short-lived, he came off on the first bend, thankfully without too much damage to himself  but certainly some to the bike.This story brings a timely warning for everyone who rides anything on two wheels...

All new Tyres have a slippery coating on them due to the manufacturing process.
It takes about the first 100km to scuff this coating off, so some care is required during that first period, especially when cornering or accelerating out of bends.

Many riders have their own methods of dealing to this coating -I always give my new tyres a good scrub with soap and water to remove as much of the coating as I can, after riding my bike carefully home from the tyre shop and before I head out for a ride.

It’s so easy to assume that everyone knows about this and most Motorbike tyre shops will warn you about it but if you know of a less experienced rider who is getting new tyres, share the knowledge, it might help prevent another accident.

Motorcycling Adventures

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Thu, 03/10/2013 - 12:20pm

Check out the article in Blenheim's Wednesday Sun newspaper, 2/10/13.

Jim Millard of Renwick tells about his adventures when he and a mate headed off to complete the Mongol Rally on motorbikes. 14,500km London across Europe, through many countries and on to Ulanbaatar in Mongolia. The article makes exciting reading and will leave you dreaming about where your next adventure on two wheels might take you.

Towards the end of the article, Jim talks of teaching his girlfriend to ride to she can  be part of his next adventure, possibly in South America. - Send her to us Jim, we'll soon teach her how to ride, no problem! Excellent article, highly recommend it, love the pics that go with it. Well done Jim and The Wednesday Sun - Good Stuff!

Riding in the wind

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Sun, 29/09/2013 - 8:52am

Traditionally, springtime is the windy season in Marlborough and when we're out on the road on two wheels, it helps to know how to handle those windy conditions.

Commit these steps to memory now and practice them...

Relax your shoulders. Bend your elbows. Lean forward a little and try to keep your speed up - momentum helps you cut through the wind and gives you more stability. Ride in the centre of your lane so that if a gust pushes you to one side you've got room to recover your position on the road without crossing the centre-line or ending up in the gravel on the side of the road.                                 Try to anticipate the gusts, e.g. at gaps between buildings, trees & hedges etc and don't fight against the wind,let it move you around while still maintaining control of your bike.

In a cross wind, move your weight to the side into the wind by dropping your shoulder or moving across the seat.

The worst thing you can do is slow down, tense up and try to ride on the edge of the road. In Marlborough we cant avoid having to ride in the wind at certain times, so it's worth remembering and practicing these techniques, it will help to make your riding experience more enjoyable.

Our Video and Web-site

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Wed, 25/09/2013 - 3:03pm

Hope you enjoy our new video - created for us by Henry and Barbara Dijkstra from PULSE VIDEO - www.pulsevideo.co.nz.

Our Web-site was created for us by Bronwen Laird from VA VA ZOOM - www.vavazoom.com

We have really enjoyed working with all these people, couldn't have done it without them. Good Stuff!

Scooter Survival

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Tue, 24/09/2013 - 3:17pm

Well done to Alice who completed our (off road) Basic Scooter Handling course at the weekend. It's always a pleasure to watch confidence grow and smiles return during this course, as fear changes to understanding to confidence. Although she had never ridden her scooter before, as the course progressed so did Alice. Towards the end she was smiling as she rounded the corners, chin up, eyes looking ahead to where she wanted the scooter to go. Great to meet you Alice and all the best with your scooter!

Blenheim to Havelock and back

Submitted by motorbikeschool on Sun, 15/09/2013 - 9:15am

Saturday 14th (weather-wise) was made for Motorcyclists in Marlbrough - one out the box! We were busy most of the day but by 3.30pm we both downed tools, jumped on the bikes and headed out for a wee scratch to Havelock & back. This bit of road is in great nick at the moment and although it's not challenging in any way, it is an enjoyable ride to blow out the cob-webs. The rythym of all those gentle corners sooth the soul and at that time of the day on a Saturday there was hardly any other traffic. We turned off into Queen Charlotte Drive,headed up to the lookout over Havelock and the Marina, enjoyed the view for a couple of minutes then retraced our route back down to Havelock and back to Blenheim. Awesome. The temperature was beginning to drop as the sun got lower in the sky but this is only a short ride and we were home before the chill began to set in. The bikes were happy to have had an outing and so were we!

RIDER TIP: We recommend this bit of road (especially for Learners) for two reasons. One, because this is an ideal road to practice your cornering skills. Take your time,memorize the corners and ride them again. Remember the rule of thumb with cornering is Slow in, Faster out. Ride it several times, Practice makes perfect and if you do get stuck behind farmer Brown tootling along at 70k/h, relax, wait till the road ahead is clear enough for you to pass him safely then leave him to get on with his tootling. Reason number two to recommend this bit of road is, that is also an ideal road to practice your NIGHT TIME riding skills. It's not far, it's relatively easy with enough corners to keep you awake and on a warm Marlborough summer evening - it's magic!  Try it.

Ride The Top of the South

Submitted by admin on Wed, 31/10/2012 - 12:34pm

Have you seen this new pamphlet, put together by the Marlborough Motorcycle Road Safety Group with support from the Marlborough District Council, Safer Journeys and MOTO NZ?

This handy little guide is small enough to tuck into your jacket pocket. It contains a map showing recommended rides in the 'Top of the South', a map of all the motorbike parks in Nelson and Blenheim, how to report traffic / road hazards and safety info for riding in the Nelson/Tasman/Marlborough regions.

Pick up your copy from the Marlborough District Council or Blenheim or Picton i-sites.

 

 

 

Competency Based Test Assesment (CBTA) Certificate

Submitted by admin on Wed, 25/07/2012 - 12:18pm

Lately we've had a few enquiries about the new Competency Based Test Assesment (CBTA) certificate, which will shorten the time you need to be on your restricted licence - so we thought we'd give you a little update.

The NZTA advise that it hasn't been introduced yet. They are currently trialing it in one region and hope to have it introduced nationally at the end of this year.

So... sorry folks, at the moment you still have to sit out the full 18 months restricted licence period. Keep an eye on the NZTA web-site for changes and we will advise when changes are introduced.

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